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[Assignment] – Less is More

I always find this subject a lot of fun as it really causes you to pick your subject and your scene very carefully. Often times when we’re photographing a scene we want to capture it all to showcase the grandness of it, but more often than not, it’s actually better to find a way to simplify the scene because as someone is viewing the photograph it makes it easier to understand and as a result will have a greater impact.

lessismore

This week your assignment is to find a way of isolating your subject and really focusing in on the idea of minimalism in your photography. For some extra help on this topic you can check out this post on DPS about negative space and how to make it work for your photography.

As always here’s a handful of Less is More Examples from Flickr for your inspiration

Minimalism...Photo By: | US |

minimalism - feather
Photo By: Georgie Sharp

The Minimalism
Photo By: Wolfman- K

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On the forum you can upload as you typically do, but make sure you upload your photo to the proper thread in the Assignments Forum, and do not create a separate thread for your photograph.

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23 Responses to “[Assignment] – Less is More”

  1. This should be a fun topic and if it ever stops snowing or raining, maybe I can get out to do some shooting.  In the meantime, I found this image in my files and it seems to fit.

     

    Snowy-Light-Bulb.jpg

  2. Silvia Saviozzi April 27, 2014 at 7:21 am

    Hi, this is the tail of a parrot. Hope you like it.
    Silvia

  3. In my younger days, I was an avid climber. Other than healed injuries from a serious climbing accident, the only memento I have of those days is my old climbing rope. It’s been hanging outside subjected to the vicissitudes of Melbourne weather for the past 25 years. I’ve long thought there was a picture in this rope and this assignment is just perfect for what I had in mind. 

    Here’s two versions of my first photo.

    untitled-193.jpg

    untitled-194.jpg

  4. Here’s my second photo.

    untitled-192.jpg

  5. Lovely, Jude! Your image certainly fits the “less is more” assignment.  Very, very nice work! 

  6. I liked the B&W a lot.  In fact, I would like to see your second image in B&W. I see this work has meaning for you!

  7. Dolores, here’s another 5.5 x 11 version of the Clove Hitch Knot in black and white.

    untitled-201.jpg

  8. I like this B&W clove hitch.  It seems very “western” to me, even though I know it’s a climbing rope.  It gives me more a feeling of a lariat type of rope, probably because of the obvious aging.  The color image doesn’t evoke that same feeling.  Good job.

  9. Oh yes, although I’m not fond of B&W per see, I really like this one in B&W!  

  10. Well, I tried a bunch of different things. Not quite as much “less” as the assignment was aiming for… First two pics from yesterday when it was sunny. Rain today for the 3rd pic. Gotta love my weather resistant Pentax K-30 and DA 18-135 combo!

    IMGP6698.jpg

    IMGP6699.jpg

    IMGP6712.jpg

  11. I think this capture of our resident hummingbird would qualify as “less is more.”  I’ve never seen one with this coloring; I’d love to know what kind of hummer it is.  Please let me know, if you know.  Steve, maybe?Resident_Hummingbird-0001.jpg

  12. Mark Hoffman said
    Well, I tried a bunch of different things. Not quite as much “less” as the assignment was aiming for… First two pics from yesterday when it was sunny. Rain today for the 3rd pic. Gotta love my weather resistant Pentax K-30 and DA 18-135 combo!

    IMGP6698.jpg

    Mark, I love the first one. Being an old ‘woodie’, I am always drawn to a photo featuring wood and grain. Great shot. Is it as taken, or have you done some post capture editing?

  13. revdfw said
    I think this capture of our resident hummingbird would qualify as “less is more.”  I’ve never seen one with this coloring; I’d love to know what kind of hummer it is.  Please let me know, if you know.  Steve, maybe?Resident_Hummingbird-0001.jpg

    Perfect! This is definitely a photo that fits the category. 

    Delores, did you consider adding some light to the hummingbird? I think it would work well.

  14. I did, Don.  He was very, very dark before I started.  When I see him sitting up on that post, he looks all black, unless the sun catches the iridescent green on his back.    I used the radial filter to lighten him so the iridescent green would show at all. But, after reading your suggestion, I went back, deleted the radial filter and tried using the adjustment brush.  I couldn’t successfully add any more exposure than I had gotten with the radial filter without distorting what I knew the colors to be–and it didn’t lighten the midnight black of his head and tail, at all.

  15. Don Barton said

     

    Mark, I love the first one. Being an old ‘woodie’, I am always drawn to a photo featuring wood and grain. Great shot. Is it as taken, or have you done some post capture editing?

    Thanks, Don. Mainly desaturation and a little exposure adjustment. Left just a bit of color to suggest some ‘age’ to it. Added some sharpening.

    For this minimalist assignment, I also liked your b/w knots best!

  16. I’m not sure if the hummingbird identification was aimed at me, but I’m definitely not an expert.  I think they are cool and really hard to capture with a camera.  Not as difficult if you have a feeder and can set up a tripod and a chair and just wait for them to appear.  I did this at my sister’s house and got some decent images.  But back to topic, there are too many species that have dark green backs and dark heads.  In fact, many appear almost black unless the light is just right.  Then they glow. 

  17. Yes, it was directed to you, Steve Priebe, because you live in the Western part of the US as I do now.  For this reason, I thought you might know what species this little one is.  In Chicago, where I lived until last year, we saw only ruby throated Hummingbirds–never the black ones you describe.  This one fits into that category; it is very black unless a little sun plays on its iridescent green back. I am amazed that you say there are many species that come in that color. 

  18. Dolores,

    Yes, most of the hummers that are common in our part of the world have green backs.  Even the famous ruby-throated is green from behind.  And trying to see details in a bird that is so small and doesn’t sit still for more than a second or so can be tough.  Do you have a feeder?  That’s the best way I know of to capture them, but even that takes patience.  When I did that at my sister’s house, it worked pretty well.  I set the camera on the tripod aimed at the feeder. I sat in a chair and used a cable release to take a picture when one showed up.  I got a lot of bad shots, but here is one (out of about 75) turned out okay.  Not sure what kind this is either.

    hummingbird-1.jpg

  19. Yes, our ruby throat hummingbirds in Illinois had green backs, too.  This blackchinned specimen is a gorgeous.  I’ve just never seen, nor have I found an image online that is jet black all over its body, except for the green shimmer on its back. That shimmer is a different color, too–more teal than the green in your blackchinned beauty.  We had our feeder up or a while, but it is too light weight for the winds we have out here; we had to take it down.  We’ll find one that is heavier, I hope, soon.  Incidentally, I’d be interested in your EXIF for this image. 

    Later . . . I think I’ve discovered that the hummingbird I’m trying to identify is a male blackchinned HB.  I found two images online that indicate so.  Which makes sense because you have seen many in those colors.  So if I’m right, the “lovely” you pictured on page one would be a female.  Your image is almost perfect!  (If it did take 75 shots, they paid off)!

  20. Although not a brand new image, I did take it only a month ago with minimalism in mind.P1010702.jpg

  21. Keep on writing, great job!

  22. I was interested in seeing this Assignment surface again because just a few weeks ago I learned that the hummingbird in my photo was NOT a blackchinned hummer, but a Costa’s hummingbird, a species found in the desert.  He sat regally on that stock, daily, for several months and then 10 days or so, ago, I am so sad to report that he disappeared and has not been seen since. :(

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